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Webinar Recording: The role of electrical stimulation in the treatment of dysphagia

Presented by Dr. Christy Ludlow, Ph.D.

Click here for a recording of the live webinar broadcast on August 27, 2014. This video includes a 13 minute opening introduction and then a one hour presentation by Dr. Ludlow.

Description: Elevation of the hyoid and larynx help to close the vestibule to protect the airway during swallowing. Individuals with dysphagia sometimes have reduced or delayed hyo-laryngeal elevation, which can put them at risk for aspiration. Surface electrical stimulation is currently used during therapy for dysphagia.  Dr. Ludlow’s presentation will provide recent information about the physiological effects of surface electrical stimulation during swallowing and what evidence is available on whether it is effective as a therapy for patients with dysphagia.

Presenter: Dr. Christy Ludlow is currently a Professor at James Madison University (JMU) in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders where her research interests include manipulating neural control for dysphagia rehabilitation.  Dr. Ludlow received a B.S. degree in physiological psychology and an M.S. degree in speech pathology and audiology from McGill University. After completing her clinical training, she received her Ph.D. in speech pathology and psycholinguistics from New York University. Dr. Ludlow then moved to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes (NINDS) in 1974 where she supervised grants and contracts on voice and speech research. In 1988 she moved fulltime to the intramural program and developed a laboratory program studying the neural control of voice, speech and swallowing.  Dr. Ludlow received Honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in 2005 and the 2006 Award of the American Laryngological Association. Dr. Ludlow’s research covers the neurological organization and control of laryngeal function in voice, speech and swallowing, the pathogenesis of idiopathic voice and speech disorders, and the effects of functional electrical and sensory stimulation in severe swallowing disorders.



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