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Dysphagia Support in Pakistan: Illuminating the Path of Awareness and Care

Shifa International Hospital and NFOSD:

Pioneers of Dysphagia Support in Pakistan,

Illuminating the Path of Awareness and Care


Written By Faiza Badar, Manager Rehabilitation Department

Shifa International Hospital

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NFOSD Dysphagia Volunteerism Award

We are pleased to announce the NFOSD Volunteerism Award for individuals who have demonstrated exceptional volunteerism and advocacy in the field of swallowing disorders. This award recognizes the extraordinary efforts of those who have dedicated themselves to improving the lives of individuals with swallowing disorders, and we are excited to have the opportunity to recognize their contributions.

This award is open to volunteers from around the world, with special consideration given to those who have made significant international efforts. We encourage anyone who has been actively involved in raising awareness or providing support for individuals with swallowing disorders to apply.

To apply for the NFOSD Volunteerism Award, please submit a brief essay detailing your volunteer and advocacy efforts, providing specific details of the initiatives you have undertaken. We also encourage you to include any relevant personal experiences that have motivated your advocacy efforts.

Please submit your application by May 31, 2023, along with any supporting materials that you feel would help to illustrate your advocacy efforts. The winner of the NFOSD Volunteerism Award will receive a certificate of recognition and a $500 cash prize and will be recognized on social media during Dysphagia Awareness Month.

Thank you for your dedication to improving the lives of individuals with swallowing disorders. We look forward to reviewing your application. Please reach out to info@nfosd.com with any questions.


Terms and Conditions

By submitting an application for the NFOSD Dysphagia Volunteerism Award, applicants agree to these terms and conditions:

  1. Eligibility: The NFOSD Dysphagia Volunteerism Award is open to individuals who have demonstrated exceptional volunteerism and advocacy in the field of swallowing disorders. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age and must have been actively involved in raising awareness and/or providing support for individuals with swallowing disorders.
  2. Application Submission: All applications must be submitted by the deadline specified in the invitation. Late applications will not be accepted. Applications must be submitted electronically, through the online portal (link above). All materials submitted become the property of the NFOSD and will not be returned.
  3. Application Requirements: Applications must include a brief essay (max 1,000 words) detailing the applicant’s volunteer and advocacy efforts, including any initiatives undertaken to raise awareness or provide support for individuals with swallowing disorders. Personal experiences that have motivated the advocacy efforts should also be included. Supporting materials such as photographs, videos, or news articles may be included but are not required. Applications exceeding 1,000 words will not be considered.
  4. Judging: All applications will be reviewed by the NFOSD Dysphagia Volunteerism Award Committee, which will select the winner based on the strength of the application and the extent to which the applicant has made significant contributions to the field of swallowing disorders. The decision of the committee is final and binding.
  5. Award: The winner of the NFOSD Dysphagia Volunteerism Award will receive a certificate of recognition and a $500 cash prize. The award winner will be announced during Dysphagia Awareness Month.
  6. Publicity: By submitting an application, applicants agree to allow the NFOSD to use their name and likeness in promotional materials related to the NFOSD Volunteerism Award.
  7. Privacy: Personal information collected through the application process will only be used for the purposes of reviewing applications and administering the NFOSD Volunteerism Award.
  8. Disqualification: The NFOSD Dysphagia Volunteerism Award Committee reserves the right to disqualify any applicant who fails to comply with these terms and conditions or who submits false or misleading information.
  9. Limitation of Liability: The NFOSD Dysphagia Volunteerism Award Committee is not responsible for lost, late, or misdirected applications, or for any technical difficulties that may arise during the application process.



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Airway Protection Program: Expiratory Muscle Strength Training for Dysphagia Treatment

Let’s talk aspiration. I hate to even bring it up. It is a word that makes physicians, speech-language pathologists (SLPs), and many people living with swallowing disorders cringe.  Why? If you have lived with dysphagia or cared for someone who has, you know that dysphagia and aspiration can be linked to potentially life-threatening complications, like aspiration pneumonia. So, when we talk about aspiration, we want to talk about reducing it. There are several causes of aspiration and a dysphagia treatment program needs to target those issues specifically to be effective. One reason food and/or liquid can enter the lungs is due to poor airway protection. This article reviews the emerging evidence that expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is one treatment that can improve airway protection.

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Feeding the Medically Fragile Infant

Written by Rebecca Brown, M.S., CCC-SLP, CNT 

Amy’s Story

Amy was born at 24 weeks gestational age, 16 weeks before her due date. Amy was born with her twin, but her sister did not live more than twenty-four hours after delivery. Since delivery, Amy has undergone multiple procedures, including x-rays, eye exams, head ultrasounds, and phototherapy. She was on mechanical ventilation because of her immature lungs for more than a month before being able to breathe without the assistance of the ventilator.  Amy still required supplemental oxygen through a nasal cannula in order to support her breathing. At 32 weeks, Amy began demonstrating signs of hunger, including bringing hands to mouth, opening her mouth wide, and moving her head around to search for a breast or bottle. How should the medical team approach feeding this medically fragile infant?

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Swallowing Exercise with Biofeedback

You may have heard the term biofeedback mentioned to you by your clinician or you may have come across it on this very site. Some of you may have even received swallowing therapy with the help of biofeedback. But what is it actually and why do speech-language pathologists use it?

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