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Dysphagia Research Society Conference

DRS 2013 Brochure CoverThe 21st Annual Dysphagia Research Society (DRS) Meeting and Post-Graduate course were held at the Olympic Fairmont Hotel in Seattle Washington and ran for four days beginning on March 13, 2013. It is a meeting of the who’s who (and who will be) in swallowing disorder research and treatment. Days began at 7:00 AM and went into the early evening.

Day one was a Post Graduate course and included almost 30 presenters covering pediatric dysphagia, video fluoroscopic safety, assessment techniques, and much more.

Days two through four focused on research including regenerative medicine, poster session presentations, translational medicine, and an NFOSD patient panel. Day 3 began with a meet your mentor breakfast in a speed dating format. There were about one dozen exhibitor tables: the NFOSD, Swallow Solutions, Nestle, Passy-Muir, and others.

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Making Every Bite Count

Healthy foodWritten by Laura Michael (Byline below)

When you are having trouble swallowing, getting the proper calories and nutrition for healing and health can be quite a challenge. Making foods that are pleasurable to look at, taste good and are also packed with calories and nutrition are the keys to making every bite count.

According to the American Dietetic Association, a healthy diet should consist of 45 to 65 percent of calories from carbohydrates, 30 to 35 percent from fat and the remaining 10 percent, or so, from protein.

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Real Science; Real Hope! – Adult Stem Cell Human Tongue Infusion Initiative (Update)

On March 9, 2013 we published an article on a ground breaking swallowing treatment initiative to infuse adult stem cells into a human tongue by Christmas day 2014. [Click here to view that article].

Two days later, on March 11, 2013, we received an “A List” tour of the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures (IRC). The NFOSD would like to thank our hosts Dr. Peter Belafsky (Phase I trial Principal Investigator), Dr. Jan Nolta (IRC director), Gerhard Bauer (Director of Good Manufacturing Practices), and Jane McClusky (tour facilitator extraordinaire).

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SLPs… Just Want to Have Fun! View Amazing Laryngeal Karaoke Video.

Erin Las Vegas[Click on image to the left to jump right to the video.]

The NFOSD had the privilege of attending the 8th annual Advance Practices in Speech and Dysphagia Conference. The meeting held February 24th to 26th in Las Vegas and aptly nicknamed the Sin City Laryngology Conference was packed with almost 300 speech language swallowing professionals, Speech Language Pathologists and Physicians.

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How Aging Affects Our Swallowing Ability

Byline: Rebecca Leonard, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, UC Davis

[Editors note: Click on the image below to view a 16 second video fluoroscopy clip of a swallow by a 20-something year old (on the left) versus a 70-something year old (on the right). Notice how smoothly liquids glide down the throat of the younger subject versus the effort and time required by the older subject to clear his throat. Comment — How nice it would be to be young again! Video provided courtesy of Rebecca Leonard.]

Swallowing difficulty (dysphagia) is a common consequence of many medical conditions, including stroke, chronic diseases that affect the nervous system and surgeries that affect the head and neck.  But swallowing difficulty can also be associated with aging.  In fact, it has been estimated that as many as 20% of individuals over the age of 50 years, and most individuals by the age of 80 years, experience some degree of swallowing difficulty. Individuals over the age of 65 years accounted for 12.9% of the U.S. population in 2009, and are expected to account for 19% of the population by 2030.  These large and growing numbers motivate us to understand all we can about how aging affects swallowing.  Hopefully, what we learn will help us treat, and possibly prevent, dysphagia in the elderly.

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