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NFOSD Webinar: Myofascial Release & Manual Therapy in Dysphagia Treatment

Myofascial Release and Manual Therapy in Dysphagia Treatment for Patients Following Head/Neck Cancer

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Date and Time:  Wednesday, November 15th, 2017 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT

 

No ASHA CEUs will be offered for this webinar.

 

Webinar Description: Myofascial release (MFR) and manual therapy is an emerging treatment for patients who have dysphagia due to radiation-induced fibrosis following head/neck cancer.  While there is limited published research to date on the use of this modality in swallowing therapy, reports of patient response and clinician experience with this treatment tool have been positive.

This presentation will discuss the following:

  • The challenges of treating dysphagia with head and neck cancer patients
  • The rationale and goals for using this modality in dysphagia treatment
  • Various techniques used in therapy sessions and home programs
  • Case studies of patients successfully treated with this modality as a part of their swallowing therapy

 

Learner Outcomes: 

Explain the rationale for using myofascial release/manual for patients following XRT for head and neck cancer

Discuss the goals for myofascial release/manual therapy in dysphagia treatment

Describe techniques of myofascial release/manual therapy used in dysphagia treatment

 

Meet the Presenter: 

Jen Carter, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BCS-S is a speech pathologist with 25 years of experience treating adults with dysphagia.   She is a board-certified specialist in swallowing and currently has a private practice in Denver, Colorado, the Carter Swallowing Center, specializing in the treatment of dysphagia.  Jen has successfully treated numerous patients with dysphagia following head and neck cancer using myofascial release/manual therapy as part of her swallowing treatment.

In addition to treating patients at her swallowing clinic, Jen frequently lectures on dysphagia treatment at the local, state, and national level.   She has a blog about dysphagia treatment on her website www.carterswallowingcenter.com , and she has written about various dysphagia topics for the SIG 13 Perspectives, The ASHA Leader, and the blog, Dysphagia Café.   She is an instructor for the VitalStim Therapy course and has recorded webinars about esophageal dysphagia, neurophysiology of swallowing, and exercise physiology principles in swallowing treatment for CIAO Seminars.

Click Here to Register Now

 

Medical disclaimer. This Webinar is for informational purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with an appropriate health care professional, as each individual’s medical situation is unique. It is important that you consult with your medical professional (e.g., physician, SLP) before implementing any course of treatment. Experiences that are new to you should be done with the help of a caregiver and when access to emergency medical care is available.

 



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Caregiver’s Guide to Dysphagia in Dementia

Byline: Rinki Varindani Desai is an ASHA-certified medical speech-language pathologist and BIAA-certified brain injury specialist, specializing in the rehabilitation of cognitive-linguistic and swallowing disorders in adults. She is the founder and admin of the Medical SLP Forum, co-author of the mobile app Dysphagia Therapy and co-founder of Dysphagia Grand Rounds. Rinki currently serves on ASHA’s SIG 13 Editorial Committee as Associate Editor of Perspectives, on the Dysphagia Research Society’s Website, Communications, and PublicRelations Committee and has been selected to participate in ASHA’s Leadership Development Program 2017-2018. She has presented at national and international conferences on topics related to adult dysphagia and written numerous articles for leading SLP blogs and magazines. Originally from Mumbai, India; Rinki currently practices in Rochester, New York as Healthpro Rehabilitation’s SLP Team Leader for the Western NY region. You can follow her Medical SLP updates on Facebook and Twitter or reach out to her at rinkislp@gmail.com.


Dementia and Dysphagia

Dementia is not one specific disease. It is a broad term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory, communication, and other thinking skills; severe enough to reduce a person’s ability to perform everyday activities (Alzheimer’s Association). continue reading →



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New Webinar: Head and Neck Lymphedema — A Common Complication in Patients Treated for Head and Neck Cancer

Head and Neck Lymphedema — A Common Complication in Patients Treated for Head and Neck Cancer

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Date and Time: Tuesday, July 18th , 2017 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM EDT

No ASHA CEUs will be offered for this webinar. continue reading →



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“Traveling Space Available” II

Mackenbach, Germany

December 3, 2016 at 0900 hours

Many years ago, I wrote an article for a travel magazine called “You and Europe” in a city not far from here. The article, which dealt with hitchhiking rides on military aircraft throughout what we used to call the “European Theater” was titled “Traveling Space Available.”

Now, years later, and traveling with a gastric tube feeding apparatus on board and a supply of formula, I find those words take on a very different meaning. Will there be space available on the airplane for my supply of formula? Is there “space available” in the cabin for the occasional and necessary feedings? Can I replenish my supply of formula while traveling here in the USA and abroad? Will I join my wife or others for meals out in cafes or restaurants? Is it all worthwhile? continue reading →



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Essential History: From My Mom, To the World

By Diane Wolff

I am an author who gave up the writing life in the big city to return to the family and take care of my mother. The late, great Cathie G was one of a kind: energetic, spunky and independent. She had a great sense of humor and she ruled her children with an iron hand. She was a great mom for me and when she asked me to take care of her, I could not refuse. continue reading →