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“Traveling Space Available” II

Mackenbach, Germany

December 3, 2016 at 0900 hours

Many years ago, I wrote an article for a travel magazine called “You and Europe” in a city not far from here. The article, which dealt with hitchhiking rides on military aircraft throughout what we used to call the “European Theater” was titled “Traveling Space Available.”

Now, years later, and traveling with a gastric tube feeding apparatus on board and a supply of formula, I find those words take on a very different meaning. Will there be space available on the airplane for my supply of formula? Is there “space available” in the cabin for the occasional and necessary feedings? Can I replenish my supply of formula while traveling here in the USA and abroad? Will I join my wife or others for meals out in cafes or restaurants? Is it all worthwhile? continue reading →



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Essential History: From My Mom, To the World

By Diane Wolff

I am an author who gave up the writing life in the big city to return to the family and take care of my mother. The late, great Cathie G was one of a kind: energetic, spunky and independent. She had a great sense of humor and she ruled her children with an iron hand. She was a great mom for me and when she asked me to take care of her, I could not refuse. continue reading →



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My Belly Has Two Buttons

meikeleBy Meikele Lee, author of the children’s book “My Belly has Two Buttons” and lives in Helena, Mt.  She is a wife and mother to 3 amazing children, one of whom has a feeding tube.  She has been in cosmetology for over 10 years, but became passionate about blogging when her youngest child’s oral aversions became life threatening.  She used blogging to try and understand her son’s condition and how he can relate to others with or without a feeding tube, and to help educate the public about these life saving devices. continue reading →



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A Moveable Feast

004-1It’s hard to know which events inform our reality and which only mark the passing of time.

Waking up in the hospital with a brand new feeding tube on board was clearly one of the former.

But there I was.

I had resisted repeated proposals from medical professionals to have a g-tube inserted. They warned of the worsening dysphagia I faced due to the effects of radiation for throat cancer I’d had years earlier. continue reading →



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Xerostomia = Dry Mouth

Byline: Jennifer Kurtz is a Speech Language Pathologist and stage IV oral cancer survivor practicing at Overlake Medical Center near Seattle, Washington. Her experience has given her an unexpected, yet unique, perspective on the clinician’s role in the management of the Head & Neck Cancer population and has motivated her to advocate for aggressive, collaborative, multi-disciplinary care of all patients across a broad continuum.


Xerostomia describes the subjective sensation of oral dryness and is commonly called “dry mouth.” The typical causes of dry mouth include medications, radiotherapy to the head and neck for cancer treatment, and systemic diseases.

mouth

Xerostomia can have a profound, negative impact on quality of life. The lack of salivary production impacts the ability to eat, sleep, speak, and swallow (Lew & Smith, 2007). Adequate salivary flow allows us to speak clearly without our lips sticking to our teeth and to mix saliva with food when we chew to enable easy transfer through the oral cavity as we swallow. Inadequate salivary function can create a number of complications such as: continue reading →