Share this post: ×

Dysphagia and Multiple Sclerosis

Dysphagia was recently mentioned in the news, featuring its impact on patients with multiple sclerosis. Everyday Health, an online interactive blog, explains the most common causes of dysphagia in patients with MS, such as weakness and reduced coordination in a recent post titled, “Bite, Chew, Swallow: How to Deal with Dysphagia When You Have MS.”  Dysphagia expert, Dr. Martin Brodsky, answers questions related to the assessment, treatment, and management of swallowing disorders in this patient population.

To Read the Original Article: http://www.everydayhealth.com/multiple-sclerosis/symptoms/deal-with-dysphagia-when-you-have-ms/



Share this post: ×

New Bedside Swallow Assessment Technique

University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering researcher, Dr. Sejdić, developed a new screening method for swallowing to be performed at the bedside. According to Dr. Sejdić, the assessment includes comparing and contrasting the sound and vibrations of normal swallows against swallows of patients with dysphagia to determine abnormalities. The goal of this is research is to provide a non-invasive method to detect dysphagia that could help to reduce patient risk and hospitalization.

Read the Original Article: http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/News/2017/Ervin-Sejdic-2017-NSF-CAREER/

 



Share this post: ×

Dysphagia in the News

A recent article written by Megan Shea at the Gainesville Scene, “Hope is in the Science,” continues to raise awareness of swallowing disorders and their negative impact on the lives they affect.

Shea reviews a recent “Think Tank” gathering hosted by Drs. Emily Plowman and Ianessa Humbert at the University of Florida. Here, expert swallowing clinicians and researchers convened to discuss the future of the treatment and management of swallowing disorders.

Also mentioned in the article, is awareness being raised by those affected by dysphagia including Lisa Ingrassia’s fund established in memory of her father, who suffered from Stage IV head and neck cancer and recently passed away due to complications from dysphagia.

Read the Article: http://gainesvillescene.com/2017/01/30/science-behind-swallowing/

 



Share this post: ×

Webinar Recording: Building a Future that is Easier to Swallow

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

Originally Broadcast Live on December 7, 2016

Presentation Description: Dysphagia is an increasing problem worldwide and conventional treatments are not keeping up with the demand for timely and more effective management. A exciting array of new technologies is emerging which will make life very different — in good ways — for those with swallowing difficulties in decades to come. This presentation will discuss some of the most exciting developments with some guesses about the future shape of swallowing rehabilitation.

martin-birchall-2016-2Presenter: Dr. Martin Birchall, is a Surgeon specializing in the management of disorders of the head and neck, voice and swallowing. Martin, with co-workers at UCL and overseas, developed decellularized biologic airway scaffolds combined with autologous cells and stem cells (either differentiated or undifferentiated), culminating in the world’s first stem cell based organ transplant in an adult (Lancet, 2008, 2014) and in a child (Lancet, 2012). In October, 2010, Martin performed the world’s first combined laryngeal and tracheal transplant with surgeons at the University of California Davis in a Californian woman who is now talking well. He was named Daily Telegraph-Morgan Stanley Briton of the Year for Science and Technology in 2009 and is the first ENT surgeon to be elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences (2011) and the first to be elected NIHR Senior Investigator (2014) and to serve on the UK’s REF exercise. He runs a large multi-million pound transatlantic research programme funded by MRC, CIRM, TSB and NIHR, dedicated to the development of tissue-engineered organ replacements.



Share this post: ×

My Belly Has Two Buttons

meikeleBy Meikele Lee, author of the children’s book “My Belly has Two Buttons” and lives in Helena, Mt.  She is a wife and mother to 3 amazing children, one of whom has a feeding tube.  She has been in cosmetology for over 10 years, but became passionate about blogging when her youngest child’s oral aversions became life threatening.  She used blogging to try and understand her son’s condition and how he can relate to others with or without a feeding tube, and to help educate the public about these life saving devices. continue reading →