Share this post: ×

Xerostomia = Dry Mouth

Byline: Jennifer Kurtz is a Speech Language Pathologist and stage IV oral cancer survivor practicing at Overlake Medical Center near Seattle, Washington. Her experience has given her an unexpected, yet unique, perspective on the clinician’s role in the management of the Head & Neck Cancer population and has motivated her to advocate for aggressive, collaborative, multi-disciplinary care of all patients across a broad continuum.


Xerostomia describes the subjective sensation of oral dryness and is commonly called “dry mouth.” The typical causes of dry mouth include medications, radiotherapy to the head and neck for cancer treatment, and systemic diseases.

mouth

Xerostomia can have a profound, negative impact on quality of life. The lack of salivary production impacts the ability to eat, sleep, speak, and swallow (Lew & Smith, 2007). Adequate salivary flow allows us to speak clearly without our lips sticking to our teeth and to mix saliva with food when we chew to enable easy transfer through the oral cavity as we swallow. Inadequate salivary function can create a number of complications such as: continue reading →



Share this post: ×

Webinar Recording: Gaining Greater Body Image when Living with Dysphagia

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RECORDING

Originally Broadcast Live on August 3, 2016

Presentation Description: Dr. Fingeret’s talk with explore the concept of body image as it relates to dysphagia, reviewing the manner in which functional changes to swallowing and speech impact perceptions, thoughts and feelings about one’s body. She will review some research she has conducted in this area and offer practical tips and strategies for improving body image awareness and acceptance. She will also share insights from her experience as a NFOSD Swallowing Support Group leader and ways that support groups enhance coping for patients as they struggle with body image changes. continue reading →



Share this post: ×

When Breath Becomes Air a book by Paul Kalanithi

When Breadth Becomes AirBy: Ed Steger, President, NFOSD

[Note. Why I’m writing this book review. Plain and simple, Paul’s story resonated with me in so many ways. The book was given to me as a gift by my daughter in January, this too has special meaning.]

This book, for those of you not familiar with it, is a book about death and how death gives meaning to life. It is the new “darling” of The New York Times and NPR. It is written in a genre similar to The Last Lecture and Being Mortal. This isn’t a spoiler as it is on the book’s inside jacket cover, Paul Kalanithi, the author and a neurosurgeon, contracted lung cancer and died in March 2015 at the age of 36. continue reading →



Share this post: ×

It’s a Scary Time of Year

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 4.51.47 PM

 

Halloween is meant to be a scary time of year. But for parents of children with dysphagia, it can be an especially frightening time of year. To kids, Halloween is the one day of the year where they are encouraged to go door-to-door asking adults for as much candy as they can carry. continue reading →



Share this post: ×

“Chewing Can Be Tricky” Dysphagia Coloring Book

donna edwards 2

Pediatric swallowing specialist, Donna Edwards, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, and ASHA Fellow, has created an outstanding resource for children, parents, and professionals to learn about safe eating and to reduce the likelihood of choking. This coloring book includes a long list of fun activities that parents and professionals can use to teach children about safe and healthy eating.

 

The coloring book for young children is now available in three languages! Select your language below:

 

A new coloring book for school-age children is now available!