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Dysphagia and Multiple Sclerosis

Dysphagia was recently mentioned in the news, featuring its impact on patients with multiple sclerosis. Everyday Health, an online interactive blog, explains the most common causes of dysphagia in patients with MS, such as weakness and reduced coordination in a recent post titled, “Bite, Chew, Swallow: How to Deal with Dysphagia When You Have MS.”  Dysphagia expert, Dr. Martin Brodsky, answers questions related to the assessment, treatment, and management of swallowing disorders in this patient population.

To Read the Original Article: http://www.everydayhealth.com/multiple-sclerosis/symptoms/deal-with-dysphagia-when-you-have-ms/



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New Bedside Swallow Assessment Technique

University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering researcher, Dr. Sejdić, developed a new screening method for swallowing to be performed at the bedside. According to Dr. Sejdić, the assessment includes comparing and contrasting the sound and vibrations of normal swallows against swallows of patients with dysphagia to determine abnormalities. The goal of this is research is to provide a non-invasive method to detect dysphagia that could help to reduce patient risk and hospitalization.

Read the Original Article: http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/News/2017/Ervin-Sejdic-2017-NSF-CAREER/

 



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Dysphagia in the News

A recent article written by Megan Shea at the Gainesville Scene, “Hope is in the Science,” continues to raise awareness of swallowing disorders and their negative impact on the lives they affect.

Shea reviews a recent “Think Tank” gathering hosted by Drs. Emily Plowman and Ianessa Humbert at the University of Florida. Here, expert swallowing clinicians and researchers convened to discuss the future of the treatment and management of swallowing disorders.

Also mentioned in the article, is awareness being raised by those affected by dysphagia including Lisa Ingrassia’s fund established in memory of her father, who suffered from Stage IV head and neck cancer and recently passed away due to complications from dysphagia.

Read the Article: http://gainesvillescene.com/2017/01/30/science-behind-swallowing/

 



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Your Cancer Game Plan

Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Kelly is sharing his personal experience as part of “Your Cancer Game Plan.” This new awareness campaign focuses on tackling the emotional, nutritional and communication needs of those facing cancer. To help address these challenges the campaign aims to provide support and resources, including Kelly’s video on how to remain positive along with healthy recipes for those with head and neck cancer.  Jim’s hope in sharing his experience is to inspire others to act and know their game plan.

Your Cancer Game Plan is a collaboration between U.S. and International industry and patient advocacy groups. Click here for further information.



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How do you die of Parkinson’s Disease?

The NY Times has a periodic “Ask Well” series that runs a few times monthly and health experts (we assume) answer reader’s questions. The question of how people die from Parkinson’s disease was in today’s newspaper and resonated with me. Years ago, I asked a similar question of my surgeon, but for head and neck cancer. The most common cause of death for someone with Parkinson’s disease is pneumonia. The cause of pneumonia is aspirating foods and liquids into the lungs due to a compromised swallow.

Here’s a link to the story:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/01/13/how-do-you-die-of-parkinsons-disease/