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Stroke: Swallowing Basics

Byline:  Sarah Davies, MSc, and Maggie-Lee Huckabee, PhD. Both authors are affiliated with The University of Canterbury Rose Centre for Stroke Recovery and Research at St George’s Medical Centre.

Swallowing is something that most of us take for granted…until it goes wrong. When you, or someone close to you, have a stroke, swallowing can change from an effortless action to a major source of anxiety that can compromise health and quality of life. The good news is that swallowing recovery is possible. Wherever you are on your journey towards rehabilitation, and whatever your end goal may be, the following information is provided to answer some common questions regarding post-stroke dysphagia.

 

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Sonia Blue Profile

In 2003 I had a divorce, brain surgery and resulting DYSPHAGIA (inability or difficulty swallowing,) for six years I was fed by a stomach-tube ONLY! Many of us are not thankful for the intricate and instantaneous processes our body routinely performs because unless you are unusually grateful by nature, you don’t spend your waking moments giving thanks for your waking moments. You’re too busy working, doing the laundry, fighting with your spouse and wondering when you’re going to have sex again.

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