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Treating Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Background

Gastroesophageal reflux is the backflow of acid from the stomach into the esophagus. This occurs when there is a relaxation of the valve that connects the stomach and the esophagus, which is called the lower esophageal sphincter. When reflux occurs, it can sometimes cause inflammation of or damage to the esophagus lining, which is referred to as esophagitis or erosive esophagitis. For some people, reflux can lead to a diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus. Barrett’s esophagus is when the lining of the esophagus changes to look like the lining of the stomach, which can lead to cancer in a small number of patients, but for most patients, reflux is not this severe. Reflux is, however, the leading cause of solid food dysphagia.

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A Newfound Meaning to Life

Byline: Steve Clark from Camp Verde, AZ

In the years since I was first diagnosed with head and neck cancer I have come to one realization. There is no such thing as a “typical” case. So many delicate and complex systems pass through that part of the anatomy that every survivor tells a different story. This is mine. Glean from it what you will. I hope that it may be of help to someone. continue reading →



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What Parents Should Know About Radiation Safety and Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Studies (VFSS)

 

By: Nancy B. Swigert, M.A., CCC-SLP, BCS-S

Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders

and

Vesna Martich Kriss, MD

Pediatric Radiologist, Baptist Health Lexington

 

It has been recommended that your child undergo a video fluoroscopic swallowing evaluation, often called a modified barium swallow, to assess the pharyngeal phase of the swallow. This radiologic procedure exposes your child to x-rays which raises safety questions about the study. Here are some things parents should know about radiation safety and the video fluoroscopic swallowing exam (VFSS).

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HPV: Changing the Face of Head & Neck Cancer

Written by Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S of www.SwallowStudy.com (revised April 25, 2017). Reposted on the NFOSD website with the author’s permission. See Karen’s Biography at the end of this article.

HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is changing the face of head and neck cancer.

“How did I get tonsillar cancer? I don’t smoke or drink!”

Young people who do not smoke do NOT get cancer, right?

Wrong.

We need to have the talk — about sex and the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). continue reading →



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When Your Baby Won’t Eat

Byline: Virginia Sole-Smith; NY Times Magazine February 4, 2016

Our daughter started life on a feeding tube. Then we tried to wean her off it and began to understand the complexity of how children relate to food.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/07/magazine/when-your-baby-wont-eat.html

This is a lengthy article about Violet, a seemingly healthy newborn with a strong natural eating style. But, over the course of a week, Virginia began to decline. The story doesn’t begin with a swallowing disorder, but it evolves into one.

Three quick points, for those of you with still here:

1) At the National Foundation of Swallowing Disorders, we refer people who contact us to swallowing specialists, physicians, and medical teams worldwide on a daily basis. We do not seek compensation for these referrals nor do we receive a commission from those practitioners to whom we refer people. Our goal is to match the patient with the best and most practical medical professional.

2) We do not provide patient-specific medical advice. As with Violet, every patient is different, and the logical place to begin is with a medical assessment by a specialist versed in that patient’s underlying medical condition and age (pediatric, adolescent, adult, and geriatric) while taking location into consideration.

3) As of this posting, there were over 140 comments. Many of them were from people with infants who suffered a swallowing disorder. It is worth reading the comments. This highlights that swallowing disorders are not a medical condition that discriminates, “Swallowing Disorders can Affect Anyone.” Click here to see our brochure.