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Caregiver’s Guide to Dysphagia in Dementia

Byline: Rinki Varindani Desai is an ASHA-certified medical speech-language pathologist and BIAA-certified brain injury specialist, specializing in the rehabilitation of cognitive-linguistic and swallowing disorders in adults. She is the founder and admin of the Medical SLP Forum, co-author of the mobile app Dysphagia Therapy and co-founder of Dysphagia Grand Rounds. Rinki currently serves on ASHA’s SIG 13 Editorial Committee as Associate Editor of Perspectives, on the Dysphagia Research Society’s Website, Communications, and PublicRelations Committee and has been selected to participate in ASHA’s Leadership Development Program 2017-2018. She has presented at national and international conferences on topics related to adult dysphagia and written numerous articles for leading SLP blogs and magazines. Originally from Mumbai, India; Rinki currently practices in Rochester, New York as Healthpro Rehabilitation’s SLP Team Leader for the Western NY region. You can follow her Medical SLP updates on Facebook and Twitter or reach out to her at rinkislp@gmail.com.


Dementia and Dysphagia

Dementia is not one specific disease. It is a broad term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory, communication, and other thinking skills; severe enough to reduce a person’s ability to perform everyday activities (Alzheimer’s Association). continue reading →



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How do you die of Parkinson’s Disease?

The NY Times has a periodic “Ask Well” series that runs a few times monthly and health experts (we assume) answer reader’s questions. The question of how people die from Parkinson’s disease was in today’s newspaper and resonated with me. Years ago, I asked a similar question of my surgeon, but for head and neck cancer. The most common cause of death for someone with Parkinson’s disease is pneumonia. The cause of pneumonia is aspirating foods and liquids into the lungs due to a compromised swallow.

Here’s a link to the story:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/01/13/how-do-you-die-of-parkinsons-disease/



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Tough to Swallow

Kate

Byline: Kate Kelsall is an award-winning blogger about Parkinson’s Disease and co-hosts a Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) support group she started in Denver, CO. Her experiences as a social worker, combined with living with Parkinson’s Disease for the past 20 years and having DBS for the past 10 years, make her well-suited to viewing Parkinson’s from both of the perspective of patient and professional. She is dedicated to guiding individuals and families through the DBS experience. Check out her blog at: http://katekelsall.typepad.com/my_weblog/


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Persons with Parkinson’s Disease and Dysphagia

 

By: Mary Spremulli, CCC-SLP. Ms. Spremulli is the owner of Voice Aerobics, LLC, a Speech-Language Pathology Private Practice, located in SW Florida. She holds a speech-language pathology license in Florida, Ohio, and North Carolina, and a nursing license in Florida. She is a faculty member of Parkinson Place in Sarasota, FL, and a member of the Education Committee of the World Parkinson Program. Ms. Spremulli has been a Clinical Consultant with Passy-Muir, Inc. for over 20 years providing education to professionals and patients, and she has published articles on the topic of patient education. Since 2013, Ms. Spremulli has hosted a monthly podcast, focusing on topics related to living well with Parkinson’s and other neurological diseases.


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Couldn’t Believe It

Byline: Gloria Hevener

[Editor’s note: The NFOSD would like to thank Gloria for sharing her story. We have posted a few questions for our readers to consider at the bottom this article. We welcome your thoughtful comments and reserve the right to moderate them as needed.]

My name is Gloria Hevener.  I am 76 years old with two daughters, a son, four grandchildren and one great grandchild.  My last job was a Program Manager in Network Operations at Sprint.  I loved my work and luckily, as a result of my job at Sprint, I am very technology savvy and can use my computer and iPad to my advantage.  My husband and I did lots of traveling during our first years of retirement – nearly around the world.

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